Information technology - Home electronic system (HES) application model - GridWise transactive energy systems research, development and deployment roadmap

ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020 (E), which is a Technical Report, explains the organization and structure of the transactive energy systems research, development, and deployment roadmap.

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Publication Date
22-Sep-2020
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23-Sep-2020
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ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7
Edition 1.0 2020-09
TECHNICAL
REPORT
colour
inside
Information technology – Home electronic system (HES) application model –
Part 3-7: GridWise transactive energy systems research, development and
deployment roadmap
ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020-09(en)
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
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---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7
Edition 1.0 2020-09
TECHNICAL
REPORT
colour
inside
Information technology – Home electronic system (HES) application model –
Part 3-7: GridWise transactive energy systems research, development and
deployment roadmap
INTERNATIONAL
ELECTROTECHNICAL
COMMISSION
ICS 35.200 ISBN 978-2-8322-8852-8

Warning! Make sure that you obtained this publication from an authorized distributor.

---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
– 2 – ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020
 ISO/IEC 2020
CONTENTS

FOREWORD ........................................................................................................................... 4

INTRODUCTION ..................................................................................................................... 6

1 Scope .............................................................................................................................. 7

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................... 7

3 Terms, definitions, and abbreviated terms ....................................................................... 7

3.1 Terms and definitions .............................................................................................. 7

3.2 Abbreviated terms ................................................................................................... 8

4 Overview of the roadmap ................................................................................................. 8

4.1 General .................................................................................................................... 8

4.2 Stages ..................................................................................................................... 9

4.3 Roadmap tracks ..................................................................................................... 10

4.3.1 General ......................................................................................................... 10

4.3.2 Regulatory and policy .................................................................................... 10

4.3.3 Business models and value realization .......................................................... 10

4.3.4 System design and architecture ..................................................................... 10

4.3.5 Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure ........................................ 10

4.4 Swim lane definitions ............................................................................................. 11

4.5 Organization of material .......................................................................................... 11

4.6 Core concepts ....................................................................................................... 12

4.6.1 General ......................................................................................................... 12

4.6.2 Questions to bear in mind .............................................................................. 12

4.6.3 Benefits and enablers summary ..................................................................... 13

5 Regulatory and policy ..................................................................................................... 13

5.1 General ................................................................................................................. 13

5.2 Vision – what we hope to see at each stage .......................................................... 14

5.3 Enablers – elements required if the vision is to be realized ....................................... 15

5.4 Results – outcomes made possible by new patterns of use ....................................... 16

5.5 Benefits – how these outcomes add value ............................................................... 17

6 Business models and value realization ............................................................................ 17

6.1 General ................................................................................................................. 17

6.2 Vision – what we hope to see at each stage ............................................................. 18

6.3 Enablers – elements required if the vision is to be realized ....................................... 19

6.4 Results – outcomes made possible by new patterns of use ....................................... 20

6.5 Benefits – how these outcomes add value ............................................................... 21

7 System design and architecture ....................................................................................... 22

7.1 General ................................................................................................................. 22

7.2 Vision – what we hope to see at each stage ............................................................. 23

7.3 Enablers – elements required if the vision is to be realized ....................................... 24

7.4 Results – outcomes made possible by new patterns of use ....................................... 25

7.5 Benefits – how these outcomes add value ............................................................... 26

8 Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure ........................................................... 27

8.1 General ................................................................................................................. 27

8.2 Vision – what we hope to see at each stage ............................................................. 28

8.3 Enablers – elements required if the vision is to be realized ....................................... 29

8.4 Results – outcomes made possible by new patterns of use ....................................... 30

---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020 – 3 –
 ISO/IEC 2020

8.5 Benefits – how these outcomes add value ............................................................... 31

Annex A (informative) Core concepts .................................................................................... 33

A.1 General ................................................................................................................. 33

A.2 Regulatory and policy ........................................................................................... 33

A.3 Business models and value realization .................................................................. 33

A.4 System design and architecture ............................................................................ 33

A.5 Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure .................................................... 34

Bibliography .......................................................................................................................... 35

Figure 1 – Distribution system evolution ................................................................................... 9

Figure 2 – Example benefits and enablers for the "regulatory and policy" track ........................ 14

Figure 3 – Example benefits and enablers for the "business models and value

realization" track ................................................................................................................... 18

Figure 4 – Example benefits and enablers for the "system design and architecture" track ........ 23

Figure 5 – Example benefits and enablers for the "physical and cyber technologies and

infrastructure" track ............................................................................................................... 28

Table 1 – Example vision table ............................................................................................. 11

Table 2 – Example enablers table ......................................................................................... 11

Table 3 – Example results table ............................................................................................ 12

Table 4 – Example benefits table .......................................................................................... 12

Table 5 – Regulatory and policy vision (RPV) ........................................................................ 15

Table 6 – Regulatory and policy enablers (RPEs) ................................................................. 16

Table 7 – Regulatory and policy results (RPRs) .................................................................... 16

Table 8 – Regulatory and policy benefits (RPBs) .................................................................. 17

Table 9 – Business model and value realization vision (BMV) ............................................... 19

Table 10 – Business model and value realization enablers (BMEs) ........................................ 20

Table 11 – Business model and value realization results (BMRs) .............................................. 21

Table 12 – Business model and value realization benefits (BMBs) ............................................ 22

Table 13 – Design and architecture vision (DAV) .................................................................. 24

Table 14 – Design and architecture enablers (DAEs) ............................................................ 25

Table 15 – Design and architecture results (DARs) ............................................................... 26

Table 16 – Design and architecture benefits (DABs) ............................................................. 27

Table 17 – Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure vision (PCV) ......................... 29

Table 18 – Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure enablers (PCEs) ....................... 30

Table 19 – Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure results (PCRs)........................ 31

Table 20 – Physical and cyber technologies and infrastructure benefits (PCBs) ...................... 32

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– 4 – ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020
 ISO/IEC 2020
INTERNATIONAL ELECTROTECHNICAL COMMISSION
____________
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY –
HOME ELECTRONIC SYSTEM (HES) APPLICATION MODEL –
Part 3-7: GridWise transactive energy systems research,
development and deployment roadmap
FOREWORD

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The main task of IEC and ISO technical committees is to prepare International Standards.

However, a technical committee may propose the publication of a Technical Report when it

has collected data of a different kind from that which is normally published as an International

Standard, for example "state of the art".

ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7, which is a Technical Report, has been prepared by subcommittee 25:

Interconnection of information technology equipment, of ISO/IEC joint technical committee 1:

Information technology.
The text of this Technical Report is based on the following documents:
Enquiry draft Report on voting
JTC1-SC25/2900/DTR JTC1-SC25/2966/RVDTR

Full information on the voting for the approval of this Technical Report can be found in the

report on voting indicated in the above table.
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020 – 5 –
 ISO/IEC 2020

This document has been drafted in accordance with the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2.

A list of all parts in the ISO/IEC 15067 series, published under the general title Information

technology – Home electronic system (HES) application model, can be found on the IEC and

ISO websites.
In this document, the following print type is used:

• Bolded italics represent condensed encapsulations of the transactive energy (TE) principles

described in ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-8:2020, 6.4.

IMPORTANT – The 'colour inside' logo on the cover page of this publication indicates

that it contains colours which are considered to be useful for the correct

understanding of its contents. Users should therefore print this document using a

colour printer.
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– 6 – ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020
 ISO/IEC 2020
INTRODUCTION

It has been said that if Thomas Edison could see the electricity industry today, he would

recognize it as being much the same as 100 years ago, but that may not be the case for much

longer. The century-old paradigm of large-scale generation and distribution is starting to change

as renewable resources make more of an impact. New distributed devices, both consumer and

utility-owned, affect the grid directly and also interact with each other. Preparations are already

underway to integrate these new resources and technologies by considering operational and

policy changes based on measured and effective choices. For example, the industry is

undergoing a fundamental shift from a "load following" paradigm, where central generation

adjusts to varying demand, to a "supply following" paradigm, where responsive demand absorbs

variable generation such as solar and wind. During the transition to a more distributed system,

the industry cannot afford to design purely for either extreme. A key to success is to use

technologies that support flexible coordination of both centralized and distributed elements. One

such approach is provided by transactive energy (TE) systems.

Transactive energy systems are systems of economic and control mechanisms that allow the

dynamic balance of supply and demand across the entire electrical infrastructure using value as

a key operational parameter. This definition is from ISO/IEC 15067-3-8:2020, 3.28 [1] .

This broad definition allows us to recognize the existing use of transactive techniques in bulk

energy markets and to consider how to enable new techniques for possible use in distribution

systems, at the interface between transmission and distribution, and perhaps even more broadly.

The need for transactive energy systems is being driven by economic, technological, and

customer preference opportunities that were just beginning to exist five years ago. Better

performance and declining costs for many renewable energy sources and storage technologies

now being deployed suggest use of distributed energy resources will continue growing.

Distribution systems were not designed for large-scale deployment of distributed energy

resources with potential power flows in multiple directions. Ad hoc arrangements have worked so

far, but as the combined effects of changes that are often outside of regulatory and utility

observation and control become significant, a more robust response to maintaining and

enhancing safety, reliability, and resilience of distribution energy systems and markets is

required.

ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7 is adapted from the GridWise® Architecture Council document,

Transactive Energy Systems Research, Development and Deployment Roadmap [2], which

provides a broad perspective of how transactive energy systems and their use will evolve over

time. It has been edited to align with the format of IEC documents.
____________
Numbers in square brackets refer to the Bibliography.

GridWise is a registered trademark of Gridwise, Inc. This information is given for the convenience of users of

this document and does not constitute an endorsement by IEC or ISO.
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020 – 7 –
 ISO/IEC 2020
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY –
HOME ELECTRONIC SYSTEM (HES) APPLICATION MODEL –
Part 3-7: GridWise transactive energy systems research,
development and deployment roadmap
1 Scope

This part of ISO/IEC 15067, which is a Technical Report, explains the organization and

structure of the transactive energy systems research, development, and deployment roadmap.

2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms, definitions, and abbreviated terms
3.1 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following

addresses:
• IEC Electropedia: available at http://www.electropedia.org/
• ISO Online browsing platform: available at http://www.iso.org/obp
3.1.1
congestion

characteristic of the transmission system produced by a constraint on the optimum economic

operation of the power system, such that the marginal price of energy to serve the next

increment of load, exclusive of losses, at different locations on the transmission system is

unequal
3.1.2
cyber-physical system

smart system that includes engineered interacting networks of physical and computational

components
3.1.3
deterministic

always producing the same output when given a particular input (no randomness)

3.1.4
distribution system operator
DSO

entity responsible for planning and operational functions associated with a distribution system

that is modernized for high levels of distributed energy resources (DERs) and handles the

interface to the bulk system transmission system operator (TSO) at a locational marginal price

(LMP) node or transmission-distribution substation

Note 1 to entry: A range of other DSO models are under consideration in the industry.

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– 8 – ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020
 ISO/IEC 2020
3.1.5
prosumer
person or entity who both consumes and produces
3.1.6
stochastic optimization

minimization or maximization of a function in the presence of randomness in the optimization

process
3.2 Abbreviated terms

NOTE This list also includes some terms not used in this document, but which relate to other terms and so could

be useful for the user.
ADMS advanced distribution management system
AMI advanced metering infrastructure
BEM(S) building energy management (system)
CVR conservation voltage reduction
DER distributed energy resource
DERMS distributed energy resource management system
DMS distribution management system
DOE U.S. Department of Energy
DR demand response
DSO distribution system operator
FERC U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
GWAC GridWise® Architecture Council
IOU investor-owned utility
LMP locational marginal price
MDM meter data management (system)
PSC public service commission
PUC public utility commission
PV photovoltaic
RTO regional transmission operator
T&D transmission and distribution
TE(S) transactive energy (system)
TSO transmission system operator
VVO volt-var optimization
X2G anything to grid
4 Overview of the roadmap
4.1 General

The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) transactive energy roadmap outlines a vision and

path forward to achieve deployment of transactive energy systems at scale as an operational

element of the electric power system to facilitate the integration of DERs and dynamic end uses,

such as connected buildings. It also considers the application of transactive energy systems

(TESs) for the coordination and control of end uses – for example, in managing energy in

buildings and campuses.
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020 – 9 –
 ISO/IEC 2020

The roadmap considers drivers of change, triggers for transactive energy system deployment,

and required infrastructure for deployment at scale. Gaps in technology and infrastructure that

could require investment are identified.

The roadmap captures potential changes over time (stages) and organizes them by business

and technical tracks. Within each track, it also groups potential changes into "swim lanes" that

identify what we hope to see, what it takes for this to occur, what we see as a result, and what

these features do to add value.
4.2 Stages

The roadmap is based on considering what is required to support increasing levels of DER

penetration in electricity distribution systems. The roadmap considers the overall vision in three

stages, depicted in Figure 1, primarily characterized by the level of market development around

DER penetration. These stage definitions help the user determine what stage a given distribution

system is in, based on how its characteristics align with these definitions. Note that there are

implications for the relationship between the distribution utilities and the bulk power system, and

given the regional nature of the bulk power system, all distribution utilities within a given region

will not usually find themselves at the same stage.
SOURCE: LBNL-1003797 [3].
Figure 1 – Distribution system evolution
– Stage 1

In stage 1, DER penetration is limited. DER value is administratively set (such as in net-

metering tariffs). DER has minimal but perceivable effects on distribution system operations.

In the following clauses, this stage is characterized as "persistently demonstrated".

– Stage 2

Levels of DER penetration grow as device prices continue to drop. Net-metering tariffs begin

to be replaced with market interactions that establish the value of the DER assets.

Aggregated DER or large DER assets interact with bulk power markets based on a limited

number of value streams. Effects of DER penetration on distribution system operations are

manageable. In the following clauses, this stage is characterized as "broadly applied".

---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
– 10 – ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-7:2020
 ISO/IEC 2020
– Stage 3

DER penetration grows, affecting distribution system operations and requiring new means for

asset owners to realize return on investment. Combinations (stacks) of value streams are

realized through DER participation in local, distribution-level markets. The stacked value

streams have spatial and temporal variability that reflects operational needs in the

distribution and bulk power systems. In the following clauses, this stage is characterized as

"at scale".
4.3 Roadmap tracks
4.3.1 General

The roadmap tracks generally follow the ISO/IEC TR 15067-3-8 [1] breakdown of considerations

for TE systems into the four tracks outlined in 4.3.2 to 4.3.5.
4.3.2 Regulatory and policy

This track describes the actions needed by regulators and other policy makers to enable TE

systems as envisioned in each of the three stages. The objective of the actions in this track is to

establish an environment that enables transacting parties to understand rules of engagement

and compensation in addition to performance requirements (and penalties for non-performance).

The actions also focus on achieving a consistency of approach across jurisdictions, as much as

possible, to promote interoperability. The actions described could be carried out by different

policy-making bodies depending on the individual jurisdictions and types of utilities.

Many of the actions described in this track support development and implementation actions

described in the "business models and value realization" track (4.3.3), and to a limited extent,

the actions included in the "system design and architecture" (4.3.4) and "physical and cyber

technologies and infrastructure" (4.3.5) tracks.
4.3.3 Business models and value realization

This track focuses on the various stakeholders, their roles in TE, and how their business models

need to evolve for them to provide and realize value in each of the three stages. While the

"regulatory and policy" track describes the actions policy makers need to take to establish the

needed TE environment, this track focuses on the actions to assess and implement needed

business model changes by various categories of stakeholders, recognizing that business

model changes include value propositions on both supply and demand sides.
4.3.4 System design and architecture

This track focuses on system design and architecture actions necessary to support each stage,

specifically dealing with information interoperability to support TE valuation, and operation and

control aspects to understand and manage the effects on the electricity grid. This track depends

on the business model
...

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