Work breakdown structures for project and programme management

This document provides guidance for work breakdown structures for organizations undertaking project or programme management. It is applicable to any type of organization including public or private and any size of organization or sector, as well as any type of project and programme in terms of complexity, size or duration. This document provides relevant terms and definitions, concepts, characteristics, benefits, uses, integration and relationships related to work breakdown structures. It does not provide guidance on the use of processes, methods or tools in the practice of developing and using a work breakdown structure. Annexes A and B provide examples of work breakdown structures and relationships to other breakdown structures.

Organigramme des tâches en management de projet et de programme

Le présent document fournit des recommandations sur les organigrammes des tâches aux organismes chargés du management de projets ou de programmes. Il s'applique ŕ tous les types d'organismes, qu'ils soient publics ou privés, quels que soient leur taille ou leur secteur d'activité, ainsi qu'ŕ tout type de projet ou de programme en fonction de leur complexité, de leur taille ou de leur durée. Le présent document fournit une description et une définition des termes utiles, des concepts, des caractéristiques, des avantages, des utilisations, de l'intégration et des relations, en rapport avec les organigrammes des tâches. Il ne fournit pas de recommandations sur l'utilisation de processus, méthodes ou outils pour les pratiques de développement et d'utilisation d'un organigramme des tâches. Les Annexes A et B donnent des exemples d'organigrammes des tâches et de relations avec d'autres organigrammes

General Information

Status
Published
Publication Date
23-May-2018
Current Stage
6060 - International Standard published
Start Date
26-Apr-2018
Completion Date
24-May-2018
Ref Project

Buy Standard

Standard
ISO 21511:2018 - Work breakdown structures for project and programme management
English language
23 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview
Standard
ISO 21511:2018 - Organigramme des tâches en management de projet et de programme
French language
25 pages
sale 15% off
Preview
sale 15% off
Preview

Standards Content (sample)

INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 21511
First edition
2018-05
Work breakdown structures for
project and programme management
Organigramme des tâches en management de projet et de programme
Reference number
ISO 21511:2018(E)
ISO 2018
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2018

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Work breakdown structure concepts ............................................................................................................................................. 3

4.1 General ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

4.2 Purpose .......................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

4.3 Context ........................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

4.4 Hierarchical decomposition......................................................................................................................................................... 4

4.5 Parent–child relationships ............................................................................................................................................................ 4

4.6 Progressive elaboration .................................................................................................................................................................. 4

5 Work breakdown structure characteristics, development and relationships to other

structures ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.1 Characteristics of a work breakdown structure ......................................................................................................... 5

5.2 Development ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 5

5.2.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.2.2 Creation ................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

5.2.3 Description of the project or programme work breakdown structure elements .... 6

5.2.4 Composition of the work breakdown structure dictionary ........................................................ 7

5.2.5 Integration of multiple work breakdown structures........................................................................ 7

5.3 Work breakdown structure relationships ....................................................................................................................... 8

5.3.1 General...................................................................................................................................................................................... 8

5.3.2 Relationship to organizational breakdown structure ...................................................................... 8

5.3.3 Relationship to contracts .......................................................................................................................................... 8

5.3.4 Relationship to functional areas ......................................................................................................................... 8

5.3.5 Relationship to other structures ........................................................................................................................ 9

5.4 Control of work breakdown structure ................................................................................................................................ 9

5.5 Uses and benefits of the work breakdown structure ............................................................................................. 9

5.5.1 Uses of the work breakdown structure ........................................................................................................ 9

5.5.2 Benefits from the work breakdown structure .....................................................................................10

Annex A (informative) Work breakdown structures — Examples .....................................................................................11

Annex B (informative) Links with other breakdown structures — Examples .......................................................18

Annex C (informative) Alternatives hierarchical work breakdown structures ....................................................21

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................23

© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation on the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see the following

URL: www .iso .org/iso/foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 258, Project, programme and portfolio

management.
iv © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
Introduction

The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on work breakdown structure for those individuals

working in project and programme management, and who are involved in developing and using a

work breakdown structure. This document incorporates practices to provide benefits for project or

programme planning and control, and provides guidance on work breakdown structure concepts,

composition and relationships with other structures.
It complements ISO 21500 and ISO 21504.

The target audience of this document includes, but is not limited to, the following:

a) managers and those individuals involved in sponsoring projects or programmes;

b) individuals managing projects or programmes and work breakdown structure practises;

c) individuals involved in the management of or performance of project management offices of project

or programme control staff;
d) developers of national or organizational standards.

The application of this document may be tailored to meet the needs of any organization or individual,

so they may better apply the concepts, requirements and practice of developing and using work

breakdown structures.
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 21511:2018(E)
Work breakdown structures for project and programme
management
1 Scope

This document provides guidance for work breakdown structures for organizations undertaking

project or programme management. It is applicable to any type of organization including public or

private and any size of organization or sector, as well as any type of project and programme in terms of

complexity, size or duration.

This document provides relevant terms and definitions, concepts, characteristics, benefits, uses,

integration and relationships related to work breakdown structures. It does not provide guidance

on the use of processes, methods or tools in the practice of developing and using a work breakdown

structure.

Annexes A and B provide examples of work breakdown structures and relationships to other breakdown

structures.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms and definitions
For the purposes of this document, the following terms and definitions apply.

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— IEC Electropedia: available at https: //www .electropedia .org/
— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https: //www .iso .org/obp
3.1
100 % rule

concept concerning the entire work required to be accomplished to achieve the project or programme

scope captured in the work breakdown structure (3.13)

Note 1 to entry: The 100 % rule applies to the parent and child elements. The child level of decomposition of a

work breakdown structure element represents 100 % of the work applicable to the parent level.

3.2
functional breakdown structure

decomposition of the functions necessary to perform the work elements of a project or programme

3.3
hierarchical decomposition

process of dividing project or programme scope into successively smaller work breakdown structure

elements (3.15)
3.4
management information system

hardware and software used to support the compilation of information, analysis and reporting of

project and programme metrics
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
3.5
organizational breakdown structure

decomposition of the management team of an organization, or decomposition of the management team

that performs the work of a project or programme

Note 1 to entry: The organizational breakdown structure can include partnering or subcontracting. It is used

to illustrate the relationship between project and programme activities and the organizational units that will

manage or perform the work activities.
3.6
parent element
work that is decomposed into two or more lower level elements of work
Note 1 to entry: The lower elements of work are called child elements.
3.7
product breakdown structure
decomposition of the product into its components
3.8
progressive elaboration

iterative process to incorporate increased level of details identified during the life cycle of a project or

programme
Note 1 to entry: Also known as progressive decomposition.
3.9
resource breakdown structure
decomposition of personnel, equipment, material or other assets
3.10
responsibility assignment matrix

documented structure that shows the allocation of delegated work responsibilities designated for

delivery of scope or benefits
3.11
risk breakdown structure
decomposition of threats and opportunities for project or programme
3.12
rolling wave planning

form of progressive elaboration (3.8) where planning is accomplished in phases or time periods

3.13
work breakdown structure

decomposition of the defined scope of the project or programme into progressively lower levels

consisting of elements of work
3.14
work breakdown structure dictionary
document that describes each element in the work breakdown structure (3.13)
3.15
work breakdown structure element
work at a designated level that is either a parent or a child
2 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
4 Work breakdown structure concepts
4.1 General

A work breakdown structure is a decomposition of the entire scope of work that should be completed

in order to achieve the project or programme objectives. The work breakdown structure is used

throughout the project or programme, to establish the framework for the management of the work.

The structure should provide a logical framework for decomposing 100 % of the work defined by the

project or programme scope.

NOTE Currently, most work breakdown structures are hierarchical, and this document will focus on this

type of structure. New software models are presenting options to the hierarchical decomposition structure. See

Annex C.

Each descending level of the work breakdown structure should provide a more detailed definition of

the work. Work may be product-oriented, deliverable-oriented or result-oriented; and, additionally,

may be focused on project or programme phases, disciplines or locations. The entire scope of work of

the project or programme should include work to be done by the project or programme management

team or team members; subcontractors; and other stakeholders.
4.2 Purpose

The purpose of using a work breakdown structure should be to enhance and support the management

of a project or a programme by enabling, but not limited to, the following:
a) planning of the project or programme;

b) decomposition of the scope of the project or programme into smaller elements of work to enable

the management and control of the project or programme scope, resources and time;

c) enhancement of project or programme communication by providing a common framework for

stakeholders to use when describing and analysing the scope and performance of the project or

programme;

d) communication on the benefits resulting from various project or programme elements;

e) summarization of project performance data for strategic level reporting;

f) performance analysis across projects or programmes for particular work breakdown structure

elements with common identifiable characteristics, such as codes, to allow identification of areas of

concern and opportunities for improvement; and,

g) alignment of tasks and activities of the schedule to the work breakdown structure elements.

NOTE A work breakdown structure can in some cases be referred to as product breakdown structure, which

can have additional restrictions in its use. A product breakdown structure generally describes the resulting

output of a project, but can also refer to an existing product and its hierarchal breakdown of elements. The use of

the term can vary from one organization to another organization.
4.3 Context

The work breakdown structure is a flexible concept, and its design and overall structure should be

adapted to the requirements of the project or programme. The work breakdown structure should be

dependent on the industry, type of project or programme, and other factors such as project phases,

major deliverables, scope, organization performing the work, and location of resources. The work

breakdown structure should be flexible enough to accommodate alternative ways of organizing and

representing the work.
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
4.4 Hierarchical decomposition

The work breakdown structure should provide a hierarchical decomposition of elements to the level

necessary to plan and manage the work to meet the project or programme objectives.

The hierarchical decomposition should include 100 % of the work contained in the scope of the project

or programme. Where an element is decomposed to child elements, the aggregate of work defined

by the lower level elements should represent 100 % of the work contained in the parent element.

The parent–child convention describes a relationship with a hierarchy in which a single element may

simultaneously be the parent of a number of child elements and the child of a higher-level element.

Within a programme, the projects, other programmes and other related work should be decomposed

in a similar manner. The programme becomes the highest level of the work breakdown structure. The

same parent–child convention should apply to the logical relationships in the hierarchy. Each project,

programme or other related work element under a programme may develop a stand-alone work

breakdown structure that may be represented as a separate work breakdown structure or as part of

the combined programme work breakdown structure.

Some projects or programmes may not have a fixed scope; therefore, any unknown or undefined scope

will not be included in the work breakdown structure. These projects may use agile, progressive

elaboration, or rolling wave planning techniques, where the scope is defined as the project progresses.

In this case, the work breakdown structure represents 100 % of the scope of work known at the time of

development of the work breakdown structure. As changes of scope are identified during the life of the

project or programme, the identified scope should be taken into account within the work breakdown

structure, while maintaining the logic flow of the levels of the work breakdown structure and the

parent–child relationship.
4.5 Parent–child relationships

There are various options to create parent–child relationships, depending on the type of project or

programme and the work breakdown structure developed. There are different ways of representing

scope, which means that there are various options for developing the structure of the work breakdown

structure. The following is a non-exclusive list of parent–child relationships.

a) Child elements belong to the parent element. The relationship reflects the final segment of the

output, product or result of the project or programme that may be physical or conceptual.

b) Child elements belong to a category defined by the parent. Categories may be based on time, phase,

relationship, location, priority or discipline.

c) Child elements are part of the same state described by the parent. States may be interim versions of

the product, such as drafts, preliminary, prototype, mock up or final versions.

d) Child elements are products or services needed to complete the parent. These products or services

may include tools, prerequisite products or services, or documentation on procurement, contracts,

engineering, construction, commissioning, and project or programme management.

e) Child elements are objectives needed to complete the parent. These child elements may refer to the

project or programme objectives, change of behaviours or impact of organizational change.

These parent–child relationships may be combined to create a comprehensive decomposition of the

scope of the project or programme into the work breakdown structure.
4.6 Progressive elaboration

Progressive elaboration is especially useful when the detailed scope is unknown, undefined or subject

to change. Such progressive addition of detail to the work breakdown structure should produce a more

accurate work breakdown structure and enhance the use of the structure to manage the project or

programme. Progressive elaboration may entail one, concurrent or successive modifications to the work

breakdown structure. Rolling wave planning is a form of progressive elaboration that is time-based.

4 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
5 Work breakdown structure characteristics, development and relationships to
other structures
5.1 Characteristics of a work breakdown structure

The characteristics of a work breakdown structure should be related to the scope of the project

or programme for which it is being composed. The following are typical characteristics of a work

breakdown structure.

a) A work breakdown structure may be represented by a variety of formats. The most common

formats for a work breakdown structure are graphical, outline and tabular.

b) Not all elements of the work breakdown structure need to be decomposed to the same level, but

should be decomposed to the level needed to manage the project or programme component.

c) Each work breakdown structure element may be assigned to one person, entity or function to be

responsible.

d) A work breakdown structure should reflect the technical complexity, size and other information, as

deemed necessary for the scope.

e) A work breakdown structure defines the structure of the work and not the processes involved in

accomplishing the work.

f) A work breakdown structure should provide a hierarchical decomposition of elements, applying the

100 % rule, to the level necessary to plan and manage the work to satisfy the project or programme

objectives.

g) The content of the elements into which the scope is decomposed may be related to, but not limited

to, considerations such as industry standards, organizational procedures, or contract terms and

conditions.

h) Each element on the work breakdown structure should be assigned a unique identifier to

distinguish one element from another.

The 100 % rule should provide that if one can associate a work breakdown structure child element with

its parent element, it should be included with the associated parent element in the work breakdown

structure. Each parent element may have zero child elements or at least two child elements.

The work breakdown structure should represent collective inputs of the project or programme team

and relevant stakeholders. The work breakdown structure should be an agreed upon decomposition

of the work to be performed by the project or programme management team. Each change made to

the work breakdown structure should also be reviewed with the project or programme management

team and the identified performing organization and performers within that organization and relevant

stakeholders.
Examples of work breakdown structures can be found in Annexes A and B.
5.2 Development
5.2.1 General

The work breakdown structure should be developed early in a project or programme. Depending upon

the project or programme, a conceptual work breakdown structure may be created during the business

case process, which may be re-evaluated or further decomposed once the project or programme is

authorized. Once developed, the work breakdown structure:

a) may provide a basis for gathering cost data across projects and programmes and may correlate

with the cost management system,
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
b) should serve to maintain the breakdown of the scope,

c) should allow for project and programme status to be continuously visible and integrated,

d) should serve to facilitate communication among project or programme team members, as well as

with both internal and external stakeholders,

e) may be used for allocation of resources accordingly to the work breakdown structure elements

identified, and

f) should be maintained and updated, as needed, until the final deliverables have been completed,

delivered or transitioned to the customer.
5.2.2 Creation

The work breakdown structure should be based on approved requirements of the expected deliverables

of the project or programme or the benefits of the programme.

Certain work breakdown structure elements may be defined to a lower level than others under

conditions such as: high-cost, high-risk, high-visibility, or when involving multiple stakeholders.

The creation of a work breakdown structure may be accomplished by using one of three approaches in

conjunction with the appropriate organizational procedure governing work breakdown structures:

a) top-down identification of the end deliverable, followed by successive subdivision of the work

breakdown structure elements into detailed and manageable units;

b) bottom-up identification of elements of scope and merging, categorizing and ordering those

elements in a hierarchy;
c) a combination of top-down and bottom-up approach.

The level of detail provided by the initial work breakdown structure may vary. When using progressive

elaboration, a review of the work breakdown structure may be conducted to check that each element

represents sufficient detail.

A prior work breakdown structure can be helpful in identifying the scope of work for a new project or

programme, where similar work has been done in the past.
5.2.3 Description of the project or programme work breakdown structure elements

Work breakdown structure elements can become the project or programme control points and can be

further defined by one or more individual activities or tasks. The development of project or programme

control points in an appropriate level of detail should enable the following:
a) definition of activities in the schedule;

b) elimination of overlaps by providing that a deliverable is represented in only one work breakdown

structure element;
c) identification of the person responsible and their direct manager;

d) identification of the person to facilitate or initiate communication about the work breakdown

structure element;

e) allocation of work to the project or programme team by dividing work breakdown structure

elements to provide for accountability and control.
6 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
---------------------- Page: 11 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(E)
5.2.4 Composition of the work breakdown structure dictionary

A work breakdown structure dictionary describes each element of the work breakdown structure. It

may accompany or be integrated with the work breakdown structure. The information for each element

should provide a description of each element and may also include, but is not limited to, the following:

a) description of the element;
b) responsible organization;
c) responsible individual performer;
d) start and end dates and timescales for the deliverables;
e) resources required to perform the work of the element;
f) unique identifier;
g) definitions and technical references;
i) list of key deliverables;
j) assessment of risks;
k) performance measurement and completion criteria;
l) costs by element;

m) relationships and dependencies with other work breakdown structure elements or groups of work

breakdown structure elements.

Along with the work breakdown structure, the work breakdown structure dictionary should serve as

the basis for developing the activity list for each work breakdown structure element.

The benefits of using a work breakdown structure dictionary may be, but are not limited to, the

following:

— providing both the project or programme management team and performing members sufficient

detail to enable them to produce the deliverables of each work breakdown structure element;

— providing further detail for the scope;

NOTE Work breakdown structure dictionary element descriptions can describe the technical baseline

at a high-level, contrasting the work breakdown structure to the design or functional specifications.

— assisting in definition of and responsibility for scope of work associated with interfaces;

— avoid
...

NORME ISO
INTERNATIONALE 21511
Première édition
2018-05
Organigramme des tâches en
management de projet et de
programme
Work breakdown structures for project and programme management
Numéro de référence
ISO 21511:2018(F)
ISO 2018
---------------------- Page: 1 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
DOCUMENT PROTÉGÉ PAR COPYRIGHT
© ISO 2018

Tous droits réservés. Sauf prescription différente ou nécessité dans le contexte de sa mise en oeuvre, aucune partie de cette

publication ne peut être reproduite ni utilisée sous quelque forme que ce soit et par aucun procédé, électronique ou mécanique,

y compris la photocopie, ou la diffusion sur l’internet ou sur un intranet, sans autorisation écrite préalable. Une autorisation peut

être demandée à l’ISO à l’adresse ci-après ou au comité membre de l’ISO dans le pays du demandeur.

ISO copyright office
Case postale 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Tél.: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
E-mail: copyright@iso.org
Web: www.iso.org
Publié en Suisse
ii © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 2 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
Sommaire Page

Avant-propos ..............................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

Introduction ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................................v

1 Domaine d’application ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

2 Références normatives ................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Termes et définitions ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

4 Concepts de l’organigramme des tâches ...................................................................................................................................... 3

4.1 Généralités .................................................................................................................................................................................................. 3

4.2 But ...................................................................................................................................................................................................................... 3

4.3 Contexte ........................................................................................................................................................................................................ 3

4.4 Décomposition hiérarchique ...................................................................................................................................................... 4

4.5 Relations parent–enfant .................................................................................................................................................................. 4

4.6 Élaboration progressive .................................................................................................................................................................. 5

5 Caractéristiques d’un organigramme des tâches, son développement de et ses

relations avec d’autres structures ...................................................................................................................................................... 5

5.1 Caractéristiques d’un organigramme des tâches ...................................................................................................... 5

5.2 Développement ....................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

5.2.1 Généralités ............................................................................................................................................................................ 6

5.2.2 Création ................................................................................................................................................................................... 6

5.2.3 Description des éléments de l’organigramme des tâches d’un projet ou

d’un programme ............................................................................................................................................................... 6

5.2.4 Composition du dictionnaire de l’organigramme des tâches .................................................... 7

5.2.5 Intégration de multiples organigrammes des tâches ....................................................................... 8

5.3 Relations de l’organigramme des tâches .......................................................................................................................... 8

5.3.1 Généralités ............................................................................................................................................................................ 8

5.3.2 Relation avec l’organigramme fonctionnel ................................................................................................ 8

5.3.3 Relation avec les contrats ......................................................................................................................................... 8

5.3.4 Relation avec des secteurs fonctionnels ...................................................................................................... 9

5.3.5 Relation avec d’autres organigrammes ........................................................................................................ 9

5.4 Contrôle de l’organigramme des tâches .........................................................................................................................10

5.5 Utilisations et avantages de l’organigramme des tâches .................................................................................10

5.5.1 Utilisations de l’organigramme des tâches ............................................................................................10

5.5.2 Avantages de l’organigramme des tâches ...............................................................................................11

Annexe A (informative) Organigrammes des tâches — Exemples ......................................................................................12

Annexe B (informative) Liens avec d’autres organigrammes — Exemples ...............................................................19

Annexe C (informative) Autres organigrammes des tâches.......................................................................................................23

Bibliographie ...........................................................................................................................................................................................................................25

© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés iii
---------------------- Page: 3 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
Avant-propos

L'ISO (Organisation internationale de normalisation) est une fédération mondiale d'organismes

nationaux de normalisation (comités membres de l'ISO). L'élaboration des Normes internationales est

en général confiée aux comités techniques de l'ISO. Chaque comité membre intéressé par une étude

a le droit de faire partie du comité technique créé à cet effet. Les organisations internationales,

gouvernementales et non gouvernementales, en liaison avec l'ISO participent également aux travaux.

L'ISO collabore étroitement avec la Commission électrotechnique internationale (IEC) en ce qui

concerne la normalisation électrotechnique.

Les procédures utilisées pour élaborer le présent document et celles destinées à sa mise à jour sont

décrites dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 1. Il convient, en particulier de prendre note des différents

critères d'approbation requis pour les différents types de documents ISO. Le présent document a été

rédigé conformément aux règles de rédaction données dans les Directives ISO/IEC, Partie 2 (voir www

.iso .org/directives).

L'attention est attirée sur le fait que certains des éléments du présent document peuvent faire l'objet de

droits de propriété intellectuelle ou de droits analogues. L'ISO ne saurait être tenue pour responsable

de ne pas avoir identifié de tels droits de propriété et averti de leur existence. Les détails concernant

les références aux droits de propriété intellectuelle ou autres droits analogues identifiés lors de

l'élaboration du document sont indiqués dans l'Introduction et/ou dans la liste des déclarations de

brevets reçues par l'ISO (voir www .iso .org/brevets).

Les appellations commerciales éventuellement mentionnées dans le présent document sont données

pour information, par souci de commodité, à l’intention des utilisateurs et ne sauraient constituer un

engagement.

Pour une explication de la nature volontaire des normes, la signification des termes et expressions

spécifiques de l'ISO liés à l'évaluation de la conformité, ou pour toute information au sujet de l'adhésion

de l'ISO aux principes de l’Organisation mondiale du commerce (OMC) concernant les obstacles

techniques au commerce (OTC), voir le lien suivant: www .iso .org/avant -propos.

Le présent document a été élaboré par le comité technique ISO/TC 258, Management de projets,

programmes et portefeuilles.
iv © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 4 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
Introduction

Le présent document a pour but de fournir des recommandations sur l’organigramme des tâches

aux personnes impliquées dans le management de projets et de programmes et intervenant dans le

développement et l’utilisation d’un organigramme des tâches. Le présent document inclut des pratiques

offrant des avantages en termes de planification et de contrôle des projets ou des programmes, et

fournit des recommandations sur les concepts de l’organigramme des tâches, sa composition et ses

relations avec d’autres structures.
Il complète l’ISO 21500 et l’ISO 21504.
Le public visé par le présent document comprend, sans toutefois s’y limiter:

a) les cadres et les personnes impliquées dans le soutien financier et politique de projets ou de

programmes;

b) les personnes gérant des projets ou des programmes et mettant en œuvre un organigramme

des tâches;

c) les personnes impliquées dans le management ou la performance des bureaux de management de

projets ou le personnel en charge du contrôle des projets ou des programmes;
d) les rédacteurs de normes nationales ou propres à un organisme.

L’application du présent document peut être adaptée pour répondre aux besoins des organismes ou

des personnes, afin de leur permettre de mieux appliquer les concepts, les exigences et les pratiques de

développement et d’utilisation d’organigrammes des tâches.
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés v
---------------------- Page: 5 ----------------------
NORME INTERNATIONALE ISO 21511:2018(F)
Organigramme des tâches en management de projet et de
programme
1 Domaine d’application

Le présent document fournit des recommandations sur les organigrammes des tâches aux organismes

chargés du management de projets ou de programmes. Il s’applique à tous les types d’organismes, qu’ils

soient publics ou privés, quels que soient leur taille ou leur secteur d’activité, ainsi qu’à tout type de

projet ou de programme en fonction de leur complexité, de leur taille ou de leur durée.

Le présent document fournit une description et une définition des termes utiles, des concepts, des

caractéristiques, des avantages, des utilisations, de l’intégration et des relations, en rapport avec

les organigrammes des tâches. Il ne fournit pas de recommandations sur l’utilisation de processus,

méthodes ou outils pour les pratiques de développement et d’utilisation d’un organigramme des tâches.

Les Annexes A et B donnent des exemples d’organigrammes des tâches et de relations avec d’autres

organigrammes
2 Références normatives
Le présent document ne contient aucune référence normative.
3 Termes et définitions

Pour les besoins du présent document, les termes et définitions suivants s’appliquent.

L’ISO et l’IEC tiennent à jour des bases de données terminologiques destinées à être utilisées en

normalisation, consultables aux adresses suivantes:
— IEC Electropedia: disponible à l’adresse http: //www .electropedia .org/

— ISO Online browsing platform: disponible à l’adresse https: //www .iso .org/obp

3.1
règle des 100 %

concept concernant l’ensemble des travaux devant être accomplis pour couvrir le périmètre du projet

ou du programme est intégré dans l’organigramme des tâches (3.13)

Note 1 à l'article: La règle des 100 % s’applique aux éléments parents et enfants. Le niveau enfant de décomposition

d’un élément de l’organigramme des tâches représente 100 % du travail applicable au niveau parent.

3.2
organigramme des fonctions

décomposition des fonctions nécessaires pour réaliser les éléments de travail d’un projet ou d’un

programme
3.3
décomposition hiérarchique

processus de division du périmètre d’un projet ou d’un programme en éléments de plus en plus petits de

l’organigramme des tâches (3.15)
3.4
système d’information de management

matériel et logiciel utilisés pour prendre en charge la compilation des informations, l’analyse et la

communication des indicateurs relatifs au projet ou au programme
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 1
---------------------- Page: 6 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
3.5
organigramme fonctionnel

décomposition de l’équipe de management d’un organisme, ou décomposition de l’équipe de management

qui réalise les travaux d’un projet ou d’un programme

Note 1 à l'article: L’organigramme fonctionnel peut inclure le partenariat ou la sous-traitance. Il est utilisé pour

illustrer la relation entre les activités du projet ou du programme et les unités organisationnelles qui vont gérer

ou effectuer les activités de travail.
3.6
élément parent

travail qui est décomposé en au moins deux éléments de travail de niveau inférieur

Note 1 à l'article: Les éléments de travail de niveau inférieur sont appelés éléments enfants.

3.7
organigramme d’un produit
décomposition du produit en ses composants
3.8
élaboration progressive

processus itératif visant à incorporer le niveau de détail accru identifié pendant le cycle de vie d’un

projet ou d’un programme
Note 1 à l'article: Également connue en tant que décomposition progressive.
3.9
organigramme des ressources
décomposition du personnel, des équipements, du matériel ou d’autres actifs
3.10
matrice d’attribution des responsabilités

structure documentée montrant l’attribution des responsabilités déléguées pour les travaux en vue de

la réalisation du périmètre ou des avantages
3.11
organigramme des risques
décomposition des menaces et des opportunités pour un projet ou un programme
3.12
planification par vagues

forme d’élaboration progressive (3.8) dans laquelle la planification est effectuée par phases ou périodes

3.13
organigramme des tâches

décomposition progressive du périmètre défini du projet ou du programme en niveaux inférieurs

constitués d’éléments de travail
3.14
dictionnaire de l’organigramme des tâches
document qui décrit chacun des éléments de l’organigramme des tâches (3.13)
3.15
élément de l’organigramme des tâches

travail à un niveau désigné qui est soit un élément parent soit un élément enfant

2 © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 7 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
4 Concepts de l’organigramme des tâches
4.1 Généralités

Un organigramme des tâches est une décomposition de l’ensemble du périmètre des travaux qu’il

convient de réaliser pour atteindre les objectifs du projet ou du programme. L’organigramme des

tâches est utilisé tout au long du projet ou du programme afin d’établir le cadre pour le management des

travaux. Il convient que l’organigramme fournisse un cadre logique permettant de décomposer 100 %

des travaux définis par le périmètre du projet ou du programme.

NOTE Actuellement, la plupart des organigrammes des tâches sont hiérarchiques, et le présent document

sera axé sur ce type d’organigramme. De nouveaux modèles de logiciel offrent des options pour la structure de

décomposition hiérarchique. Voir l’Annexe C.

Il convient que chaque niveau descendant de l’organigramme des tâches fournisse une définition plus

détaillée du travail. Le travail peut être orienté produit, orienté livrables ou orienté résultat et, de

plus, peut être axé sur des phases du projet ou du programme, des disciplines ou des lieux. Il convient

que l’ensemble du périmètre du projet ou du programme englobe les travaux devant être réalisés par

l’équipe de management du projet ou du programme ou les membres de l’équipe, les sous-traitants et

d’autres parties prenantes.
4.2 But

Il convient que l’utilisation d’un organigramme des tâches ait pour but d’améliorer et de soutenir le

management d’un projet ou d’un programme en permettant notamment, sans toutefois s’y limiter:

a) la planification du projet ou du programme;

b) la décomposition du périmètre du projet ou du programme en éléments de travail plus petits afin

de pouvoir gérer et maîtriser le périmètre, les ressources et la durée du projet ou du programme;

c) l’amélioration de la communication relative au projet ou au programme en fournissant un cadre

commun que les parties prenantes utilisent pour décrire et analyser le périmètre et la réalisation

du projet ou du programme;

d) la communication sur les avantages fournis par divers éléments du projet ou du programme;

e) la synthèse des données de performance du projet à des fins de compte rendu au niveau stratégique;

f) l’analyse des performances, dans différents projets ou programmes, d’éléments particuliers de

l’organigramme des tâches ayant des caractéristiques communes identifiables, telles que des codes,

afin d’identifier des domaines préoccupants et des opportunités d’amélioration; et

g) l’alignement des tâches et des activités de l’échéancier sur les éléments de l’organigramme des tâches.

NOTE Un organigramme des tâches peut, dans certains cas, se référer à l’organigramme de produit et avoir

des limites d’utilisation supplémentaires. Un organigramme de produit décrit généralement le résultat d’un

projet, mais peut également se rapporter à un produit existant et à sa décomposition hiérarchique d’éléments.

L’utilisation de ce terme peut varier d’un organisme à l’autre.
4.3 Contexte

L’organigramme des tâches est un concept flexible, et il convient d’adapter sa conception et sa

structure d’ensemble aux exigences du projet ou du programme. Il convient que l’organigramme des

tâches dépende du secteur industriel, du type de projet ou de programme, et d’autres facteurs tels

que les phases du projet, les principaux livrables, le périmètre, l’organisme réalisant les travaux et

l’emplacement des ressources. Il convient que l’organigramme des tâches soit suffisamment flexible

pour s’adapter à d’autres façons d’organiser et de représenter les travaux.
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 3
---------------------- Page: 8 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
4.4 Décomposition hiérarchique

Il convient que l’organigramme des tâches fournisse une décomposition hiérarchique des éléments

jusqu’au niveau nécessaire pour planifier et gérer les travaux en vue d’atteindre les objectifs du projet

ou du programme.

Il convient que la décomposition hiérarchique englobe 100 % des travaux contenus dans le périmètre

du projet ou du programme. Lorsqu’un élément est décomposé en éléments enfants, il convient que

l’ensemble des travaux définis par les éléments de niveau inférieur représente 100 % des travaux

contenus dans l’élément parent. La convention parent–enfant décrit une relation avec une hiérarchie

dans laquelle un élément individuel peut simultanément être le parent d’un certain nombre d’éléments

enfants et l’enfant d’un élément de niveau supérieur.

Dans le cadre d’un programme, il convient que les projets, les autres programmes et les autres travaux

connexes soient décomposés d’une manière similaire. Le programme devient le niveau le plus élevé

de l’organigramme des tâches. Il convient d’appliquer la convention parent–enfant aux relations

logiques dans la hiérarchie. Chaque projet, programme ou autres travaux connexes dans le cadre d’un

programme peut développer un organigramme des tâches indépendant qui peut être représenté comme

un organigramme des tâches séparé ou comme une partie de l’organigramme des tâches combiné du

programme.

Certains projets ou programmes peuvent ne pas avoir de périmètre fixe; par conséquent, tout périmètre

inconnu ou non défini ne sera pas inclus dans l’organigramme des tâches. Ces projets peuvent utiliser

une élaboration progressive et agile, ou des techniques de planification par vagues, dans lesquelles

le périmètre est défini au fur et à mesure de l’avancement du projet. Dans ce cas, l’organigramme

des tâches représente 100 % du périmètre des travaux connus au moment du développement de cet

organigramme. Lorsque des modifications du périmètre sont identifiées durant la vie du projet ou du

programme, il convient de prendre en compte le périmètre identifié dans l’organigramme des tâches,

tout en conservant le flux logique des niveaux de l’organigramme des tâches et la relation parent–enfant.

4.5 Relations parent–enfant

Selon le type de projet ou de programme et l’organigramme des tâches développé, il existe diverses

options pour créer des relations parent–enfant. Il existe différentes manières de représenter le

périmètre, c’est-à-dire diverses options pour développer la structure de l’organigramme des tâches.

Une liste non exclusive de relations parent–enfant est donnée ci-après:

a) les éléments enfants appartiennent à l’élément parent. La relation reflète le segment final de

l’élément de sortie, du produit ou du résultat du projet ou du programme, qui peut être physique ou

conceptuel;

b) les éléments enfants appartiennent à une catégorie définie par le parent. Les catégories peuvent

être basées sur le temps, la phase, la relation, le lieu, la priorité ou la discipline;

c) les éléments enfants font partie du même état décrit par le parent. Les états peuvent être des

versions provisoires du produit, tels que des projets, des versions préliminaires, des prototypes,

des maquettes ou des versions finales;

d) les éléments enfants sont des produits ou services nécessaires à la réalisation du parent. Ces

produits ou services peuvent inclure des outils, des produits ou services préalablement requis, ou

une documentation sur l’approvisionnement, les contrats, l’ingénierie, la construction, la mise en

service et le management de projet ou de programme;

e) les éléments enfants sont des objectifs nécessaires à la réalisation du parent. Ces éléments enfants

peuvent se rapporter aux objectifs du projet ou du programme, à un changement des comportements

ou à l’impact d’un changement organisationnel.

Ces relations parent–enfant peuvent être combinées pour obtenir une décomposition complète du

périmètre du projet ou du programme en un organigramme des tâches.
4 © ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés
---------------------- Page: 9 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
4.6 Élaboration progressive

L’élaboration progressive est particulièrement utile lorsque le périmètre détaillé est inconnu, non

défini ou sujet à modification. Il convient qu’une telle augmentation progressive du niveau de détail de

l’organigramme des tâches aboutisse à un organigramme des tâches plus précis et améliore l’utilisation

de l’organigramme pour gérer le projet ou le programme. Une élaboration progressive peut entraîner

une modification ou des modifications simultanées ou successives de l’organigramme des tâches. La

planification par vagues est une forme d’élaboration progressive fondée sur le temps.

5 Caractéristiques d’un organigramme des tâches, son développement de et ses
relations avec d’autres structures
5.1 Caractéristiques d’un organigramme des tâches

Il convient que les caractéristiques d’un organigramme des tâches soient liées au périmètre du projet

ou du programme pour lequel il est composé. Les caractéristiques types d’un organigramme des tâches

sont les suivantes:

a) un organigramme des tâches peut être présenté selon divers formats. Les formats les plus courants

pour un organigramme des tâches sont graphiques, descriptifs et tabulaires;

b) les éléments d’un organigramme des tâches ne doivent pas tous être décomposés jusqu’au

même niveau, mais il convient qu’ils soient décomposés jusqu’au niveau nécessaire pour gérer le

composant du projet ou du programme;

c) chaque élément de l’organigramme des tâches peut être assigné à une personne, une entité ou une

fonction responsable;

d) il convient qu’un organigramme des tâches reflète la complexité technique, la taille et d’autres

informations jugées nécessaires pour le périmètre;

e) un organigramme des tâches définit la structure des travaux et non les processus impliqués dans la

réalisation des travaux;

f) il convient qu’un organigramme des tâches fournisse une décomposition hiérarchique des éléments,

en appliquant la règle des 100 %, jusqu’au niveau nécessaire pour planifier et gérer les travaux en

vue d’atteindre les objectifs du projet ou du programme;

g) le contenu des éléments composant le périmètre peut être lié, sans toutefois s’y limiter, à des

considérations telles que des normes industrielles, des procédures de l’organisme ou des conditions

contractuelles;

h) il convient d’attribuer à chaque élément de l’organigramme des tâches un identifiant unique

permettant de distinguer les éléments les uns des autres.

Il convient que la règle des 100 % prévoit que, s’il est possible d’associer un élément enfant de

l’organigramme des tâches à son élément parent, il convient qu’il soit inclus avec l’élément parent

associé dans l’organigramme des tâches. Chaque élément parent peut n’avoir aucun élément enfant ou

au moins deux éléments enfants.

Il convient que l’organigramme des tâches représente les données d’entrée collectives de l’équipe de

projet ou de programme et des parties prenantes pertinentes. Il convient que l’organigramme des

tâches soit une décomposition convenue des travaux devant être réalisés par l’équipe de management

de projet ou de programme. Il convient également que chaque modification apportée à l’organigramme

des tâches soit revue par l’équipe de management de projet ou de programme, par l’organisme identifié

en charge des travaux et les exécutants au sein de cet organisme, ainsi que par les parties prenantes

pertinentes.
Des exemples d’organigrammes des tâches sont donnés dans les Annexes A et B.
© ISO 2018 – Tous droits réservés 5
---------------------- Page: 10 ----------------------
ISO 21511:2018(F)
5.2 Développement
5.2.1 Généralités

Il convient que l’organigramme des tâches soit développé dès le début d’un projet ou d’un programme.

Selon le projet ou le programme, un organigramme des tâches conceptuel peut être élaboré pendant le

processus d’étude économique, puis réévalué ou décomposé une fois que le projet ou le programme est

autorisé. Une fois développé, l’organigramme des tâches:

a) peut servir de base pour la collecte des données de coût de projets et de programmes et peut être

mis en corrélation avec le système de gestion des coûts;
b) sert à tenir à jour la décomposition du périmètre;

c) permet de visualiser et d’intégrer en continu l’état du projet ou du programme;

d) facilite la communication entre les membres de l’équipe de projet ou de programme, ainsi qu’avec

les parties prenantes internes et externes;

e) peut être utilisé pour affecter des ressources adéquates aux éléments identifiés de l’organigramme

des tâches; et

f) est maintenu et mis à jour, si nécessaire, jusqu’à ce que les livrables finaux soient achevés et livrés

ou transférés au client.
5.2.2 Création

Il convient que l’organigramme des tâches soit fondé sur les exigences approuvées relatives aux livrables

attendus du projet ou du programme ou aux bénéfices du programme.

Certains éléments de l’organigramme des tâches peuvent être définis à un niveau inférieur à d’autres

dans des conditions telles que: coût élevé, risque élevé, grande visibilité, ou lorsque de multiples parties

prenantes sont impliquées.

Un organigramme des tâches peut être créé en utilisant l’une des trois approches suivantes

conjointement avec la procédure appropriée de l’organisme relative aux organigrammes des tâches:

a) identification descendante du livrable final, suivie d’une subdivision successive des éléments de

l’organigramme des tâches en unités détaillées faciles à gérer;

b) identification ascendante des éléments du périmètre et fusion, catégorisation et ordonnancement

de ces éléments en une hiérarchie;
c) combinaison des approches descendante et ascendante.

Le niveau de détail offert par l’organigramme des tâches initial peut varier. Lorsqu’une élaboration

progressive est utilisée, une revue de l’organigramme des tâches peut être réalisée pour vérifier que

chaque élément présente un niveau de détail suffisant.

Un organigramme des tâches antérieur peut aider à identifier le périmètre des travaux pour un nouveau

projet ou programme, lorsque des travaux similaires ont été réal
...

Questions, Comments and Discussion

Ask us and Technical Secretary will try to provide an answer. You can facilitate discussion about the standard in here.