Personal protective equipment - Eye and face protection - Vocabulary (ISO 4007:2018)

This document defines and explains the principal terms used in the field of personal eye and face
protection.

Persönliche Schutzausrüstung - Augen- und Gesichtsschutz - Wörterbuch (ISO 4007:2018)

ANMERKUNG   Diese Internationale Norm enthält Begriffe mit Änderungen, wenn angegeben, aus den in den Literaturhinweisen zitierten Normen.

Équipement de protection individuelle - Protection des yeux et du visage - Vocabulaire (ISO 4007:2018)

Le présent document définit et clarifie les principaux termes utilisés dans le domaine de la protection individuelle des yeux et du visage.

Osebna varovalna oprema - Varovanje oči in obraza - Slovar (ISO 4007:2018)

Ta dokument opredeljuje in pojasnjuje osnovne izraze, ki se uporabljajo na področju osebnega varovanja oči in obraza.

General Information

Status
Published
Public Enquiry End Date
19-Oct-2017
Publication Date
10-Jan-2019
Current Stage
6060 - National Implementation/Publication (Adopted Project)
Start Date
13-Dec-2018
Due Date
17-Feb-2019
Completion Date
11-Jan-2019

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SLOVENSKI STANDARD
SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
01-februar-2019
1DGRPHãþD
SIST EN ISO 4007:2012
2VHEQDYDURYDOQDRSUHPD9DURYDQMHRþLLQREUD]D6ORYDU ,62

Personal protective equipment - Eye and face protection - Vocabulary (ISO 4007:2018)

Persönliche Schutzausrüstung - Augen- und Gesichtsschutz - Wörterbuch (ISO
4007:2018)

Équipement de protection individuelle - Protection des yeux et du visage - Vocabulaire

(ISO 4007:2018)
Ta slovenski standard je istoveten z: EN ISO 4007:2018
ICS:
01.040.13 Okolje. Varovanje zdravja. Environment. Health
Varnost (Slovarji) protection. Safety
(Vocabularies)
13.340.20 Varovalna oprema za glavo Head protective equipment
SIST EN ISO 4007:2019 en

2003-01.Slovenski inštitut za standardizacijo. Razmnoževanje celote ali delov tega standarda ni dovoljeno.

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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
EN ISO 4007
EUROPEAN STANDARD
NORME EUROPÉENNE
December 2018
EUROPÄISCHE NORM
ICS 01.040.13; 13.340.20 Supersedes EN ISO 4007:2012
English Version
Personal protective equipment - Eye and face protection -
Vocabulary (ISO 4007:2018)

Équipement de protection individuelle - Protection des Persönliche Schutzausrüstung - Augen- und

yeux et du visage - Vocabulaire (ISO 4007:2018) Gesichtsschutz - Wörterbuch (ISO 4007:2018)

This European Standard was approved by CEN on 31 August 2018.

CEN members are bound to comply with the CEN/CENELEC Internal Regulations which stipulate the conditions for giving this

European Standard the status of a national standard without any alteration. Up-to-date lists and bibliographical references

concerning such national standards may be obtained on application to the CEN-CENELEC Management Centre or to any CEN

member.

This European Standard exists in three official versions (English, French, German). A version in any other language made by

translation under the responsibility of a CEN member into its own language and notified to the CEN-CENELEC Management

Centre has the same status as the official versions.

CEN members are the national standards bodies of Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia,

Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania,

Luxembourg, Malta, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland,

Turkey and United Kingdom.
EUROPEAN COMMITTEE FOR STANDARDIZATION
COMITÉ EUROPÉEN DE NORMALISATION
EUROPÄISCHES KOMITEE FÜR NORMUNG
CEN-CENELEC Management Centre: Rue de la Science 23, B-1040 Brussels

© 2018 CEN All rights of exploitation in any form and by any means reserved Ref. No. EN ISO 4007:2018 E

worldwide for CEN national Members.
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
EN ISO 4007:2018 (E)
Contents Page

European foreword ....................................................................................................................................................... 3

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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
EN ISO 4007:2018 (E)
European foreword

This document (EN ISO 4007:2018) has been prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 94 "Personal

safety -- Personal protective equipment" in collaboration with Technical Committee CEN/TC 85 “Eye

protective equipment” the secretariat of which is held by AFNOR.

This European Standard shall be given the status of a national standard, either by publication of an

identical text or by endorsement, at the latest by June 2019, and conflicting national standards shall be

withdrawn at the latest by June 2019.

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. CEN shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights.

This document supersedes EN ISO 4007:2012.

According to the CEN-CENELEC Internal Regulations, the national standards organizations of the

following countries are bound to implement this European Standard: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria,

Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia,

France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta,

Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland,

Turkey and the United Kingdom.
Endorsement notice

The text of ISO 4007:2018 has been approved by CEN as EN ISO 4007:2018 without any modification.

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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
INTERNATIONAL ISO
STANDARD 4007
Third edition
2018-10
Personal protective equipment — Eye
and face protection — Vocabulary
Équipement de protection individuelle — Protection des yeux et du
visage — Vocabulaire
Reference number
ISO 4007:2018(E)
ISO 2018
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
ISO 4007:2018(E)
COPYRIGHT PROTECTED DOCUMENT
© ISO 2018

All rights reserved. Unless otherwise specified, or required in the context of its implementation, no part of this publication may

be reproduced or utilized otherwise in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, or posting

on the internet or an intranet, without prior written permission. Permission can be requested from either ISO at the address

below or ISO’s member body in the country of the requester.
ISO copyright office
CP 401 • Ch. de Blandonnet 8
CH-1214 Vernier, Geneva
Phone: +41 22 749 01 11
Fax: +41 22 749 09 47
Email: copyright@iso.org
Website: www.iso.org
Published in Switzerland
ii © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
ISO 4007:2018(E)
Contents Page

Foreword ........................................................................................................................................................................................................................................iv

1 Scope ................................................................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

2 Normative references ...................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3 Terms and definitions ..................................................................................................................................................................................... 1

3.1 Risks and hazards ................................................................................................................................................................................. 1

3.2 Optical radiation .................................................................................................................................................................................... 2

3.3 Sources of non-ionizing radiation .......................................................................................................................................... 4

3.4 Radiometry and photometry ...................................................................................................................................................... 7

3.5 General terms ........................................................................................................................................................................................13

3.5.1 Types and components of eye and face protectors .........................................................................13

3.5.2 Geometrical properties of eye and face protection ........................................................................17

3.5.3 Terms relating to the non-lens part of protectors ..........................................................................19

3.5.4 Welding protectors .....................................................................................................................................................20

3.5.5 Secondary lenses for welding protectors ................................................................................................21

3.5.6 Mesh protectors .............................................................................................................................................................21

3.5.7 Protection from short circuit electric arc ................................................................................................22

3.6 Optical materials ................................................................................................................................................................................23

3.7 Optical properties of components and lenses ..........................................................................................................24

3.8 Optical properties of lenses, excluding transmittance ...................................................................................27

3.9 Wearer characteristics...................................................................................................................................................................31

3.10 Filters, absorption, transmission and reflection .....................................................................................................32

3.10.1 General terms ..................................................................................................................................................................32

3.10.2 Polarized radiation and polarizing filters .........................................................................................48

3.10.3 Welding filters .................................................................................................................................................................50

3.11 Test equipment ....................................................................................................................................................................................53

4 Glossary of abbreviations and symbols .....................................................................................................................................55

Annex A (informative) Spectral weighting functions and spectral distributions ...............................................57

Bibliography .............................................................................................................................................................................................................................67

Index .................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................69

© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved iii
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
ISO 4007:2018(E)
Foreword

ISO (the International Organization for Standardization) is a worldwide federation of national standards

bodies (ISO member bodies). The work of preparing International Standards is normally carried out

through ISO technical committees. Each member body interested in a subject for which a technical

committee has been established has the right to be represented on that committee. International

organizations, governmental and non-governmental, in liaison with ISO, also take part in the work.

ISO collaborates closely with the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) on all matters of

electrotechnical standardization.

The procedures used to develop this document and those intended for its further maintenance are

described in the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 1. In particular the different approval criteria needed for the

different types of ISO documents should be noted. This document was drafted in accordance with the

editorial rules of the ISO/IEC Directives, Part 2 (see www .iso .org/directives).

Attention is drawn to the possibility that some of the elements of this document may be the subject of

patent rights. ISO shall not be held responsible for identifying any or all such patent rights. Details of

any patent rights identified during the development of the document will be in the Introduction and/or

on the ISO list of patent declarations received (see www .iso .org/patents).

Any trade name used in this document is information given for the convenience of users and does not

constitute an endorsement.

For an explanation on the voluntary nature of standards, the meaning of ISO specific terms and

expressions related to conformity assessment, as well as information about ISO's adherence to the

World Trade Organization (WTO) principles in the Technical Barriers to Trade (TBT) see the following

URL: www .iso .org/iso/foreword .html.

This document was prepared by Technical Committee ISO/TC 94, Personal safety — Protective clothing

and equipment, Subcommittee SC 6, Eye and face protection.

This third edition cancels and replaces the second edition (ISO 4007:2012), which has been technically

revised. This third edition builds on the second edition, which was partly based on EN 165.

The main changes compared to the previous edition are as follows.

— The word “ocular” has been changed to “lens” to describe the transparent material through which

the wearer looked.

— Some terms have been moved and renumbered to more suitable positions, e.g. some of the terms

that were in the “properties of materials” subclause are now in the “transmittance” subclause.

— 52 new terms have been added, over 100 terms or definitions have been modified and sources have

been updated. Greater information about the source of definitions is given where these have been

copied from other standards.

— The following terms have been deleted: giant-pulsed laser, haze, He-Ne laser, optical class, protective

ocular, radiation power, untinted ocular, very-high-pressure (intensity) mercury vapour lamp.

— A term relating to the transmittance between 380 nm and 400 nm has been added. Although the

definition for UV-A continues to take the wavelength limits of 315 nm to 380 nm, many of the terms

and definitions relating to UV-A allow the upper limit to be either 380 nm or 400 nm, depending

upon the application.

— Terms relating to “mesh protectors” and “additional lenses” have been added for use in the appropriate

standards.

— hyphens have been removed from many terms relative to the second edition, e.g. in “eye-protector”

and “dark-state”, but have been kept in “as-worn”, “blue-light” and “gradient-tinted”, and in those

cases where they would generally be used in English.
iv © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
ISO 4007:2018(E)

Any feedback or questions on this document should be directed to the user’s national standards body. A

complete listing of these bodies can be found at www .iso .org/members .html.
© ISO 2018 – All rights reserved v
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SIST EN ISO 4007:2019
INTERNATIONAL STANDARD ISO 4007:2018(E)
Personal protective equipment — Eye and face protection
— Vocabulary
1 Scope

This document defines and explains the principal terms used in the field of personal eye and face

protection.
2 Normative references
There are no normative references in this document.
3 Terms and definitions

ISO and IEC maintain terminological databases for use in standardization at the following addresses:

— ISO Online browsing platform: available at https: //www .iso .org/obp
— IEC Electropedia: available at http: //www .electropedia .org/

NOTE See also the CIE International lighting vocabulary: Available at: http: //eilv .cie .co .at/.

3.1 Risks and hazards
3.1.1
safety, noun
freedom from risk (3.1.4) that is not tolerable

Note 1 to entry: The term “safe” is often understood by the general public as the state of being protected from

all hazards (3.1.3). However, this is a misunderstanding: “safe” is rather the state of being protected from

recognized hazards that are likely to cause harm (3.1.2). Some level of risk is inherent in products or systems.

The use of the terms “safety” and “safe” as descriptive adjectives should be avoided when they convey no useful

extra information. In addition, they are likely to be misinterpreted as an assurance of freedom from risk. The

recommended approach is to replace, wherever possible, the terms “safety” and “safe” with an indication of

the objective. For example, use “protective helmet” instead of “safety helmet”. See also ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014,

Clause 4.

[SOURCE: ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014, 3.14, modified — the term has been identified as a noun, and “which”

in the definition has been changed to “that”.]
3.1.2
harm

injury or damage to the health of people, or damage to property or the environment

[SOURCE: ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014, 3.1]
3.1.3
hazard
potential source of harm (3.1.2)
[SOURCE: ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014, 3.2]
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ISO 4007:2018(E)
3.1.4
risk

combination of the probability of occurrence of harm (3.1.2) and the severity of that harm

Note 1 to entry: The probability of occurrence includes the exposure to a hazardous situation, the occurrence of a

hazardous event and the possibility to avoid or limit the harm.
[SOURCE: ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014, 3.9]
3.1.5
intended use

use in accordance with information provided with a product or system, or, in the absence of such

information, by generally understood patterns of usage
[SOURCE: ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014, 3.6]
3.1.6
reasonably foreseeable misuse

use of a product or system in a way not intended by the supplier, but which can result from readily

predictable human behaviour

Note 1 to entry: Readily predictable human behaviour includes the behaviour of all types of users, e.g. the elderly,

[5]
children and persons with disabilities. For more information, see ISO 10377 .

Note 2 to entry: In the context of consumer safety (3.1.1), the term “reasonably foreseeable use” is increasingly

used as a synonym for both intended use (3.1.5) and reasonably foreseeable misuse.

[SOURCE: ISO/IEC Guide 51:2014, 3.7]
3.1.7
blue-light hazard

potential for a photochemically induced retinal injury resulting from optical radiation (3.2.1) exposure

in the wavelength range 300 nm to 700 nm
3.1.8
infrared lens hazard

potential for a thermal injury to the crystalline lens (and cornea) of the eye resulting from exposure to

optical radiation (3.2.1) in the wavelength range 780 nm to 3 000 nm
3.1.9
retinal thermal hazard

potential for a thermal retinal injury resulting from exposure to optical radiation (3.2.1) in the

wavelength range 380 nm to 1 400 nm
3.1.10
ultraviolet hazard

potential for acute and chronic adverse effects to the skin and eye resulting from exposure to optical

radiation (3.2.1) in the wavelength range 250 nm to 400 nm
3.2 Optical radiation
3.2.1
optical radiation

electromagnetic radiation at wavelengths between the region of transition to X-rays (λ ≈ 1 nm) and the

region of transition to radio waves (λ ≈ 1 mm)

Note 1 to entry: Optical radiation is usually subdivided into the following spectral ranges, with a possible overlap

at the longer wavelength limit of the UV spectrum:
— ultraviolet radiation (3.2.3);
— visible radiation (3.2.2);
2 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
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ISO 4007:2018(E)
— infrared radiation (3.2.4).
[SOURCE: CIE S 07:2011, 17-848, modified — Note 1 to entry has been added.]
3.2.2
visible radiation
light
any optical radiation (3.2.1) capable of causing a visual sensation directly

Note 1 to entry: There are no precise limits for the spectral range of visible radiation since they depend upon

the amount of radiant power (3.4.7) reaching the retina and the responsivity of the observer. The lower limit is

generally taken between 360 nm and 400 nm and the upper limit between 760 nm and 830 nm.

Note 2 to entry: For the purposes of standards on eye protection, the limits of the visible spectrum are usually

taken to be 380 nm to 780 nm. These limits coincide with those in ISO 20473 which specifies the spectral

ranges for optics and photonics standards and avoids the overlap at either end of the visible spectrum in the CIE

definition.

Note 3 to entry: For lasers, the visible wavelength band is defined as 400 nm to 700 nm. This is because eye

protection against low-power visible lasers often relies on the eye’s aversion response, which includes the blink

reflex (3.5.1.17). For this to happen, the laser beam (3.3.14) should appear very bright, hence the need to cut off

the extremes of the visible band where the spectral luminous efficiency (3.4.11) of the eye is quite low.

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-1402, modified — Notes to entry 2 and 3 have been added.]

3.2.3
ultraviolet radiation
UV radiation
UVR

optical radiation (3.2.1) for which the wavelengths are shorter than those for visible radiation (3.2.2)

Note 1 to entry: For standards for protection against solar radiation including, for example, sunglasses for

general use, the upper limit of UV-A is sometimes taken as 380 nm. For standards on requirements for protection

against radiation from artificial sources, the upper limit of UV-A is usually taken as 400 nm, which is consistent

with the CIE definition. The 400 nm upper limit is also used by, amongst others, ICNIRP, ACGIH, the World Health

Organization and in the European Artificial Optical Radiation Directive.

Note 2 to entry: The limit of 380 nm coincides with ISO 20473 which specifies the spectral range of ultraviolet

radiation for standards in optics and photonics and subdivides the UV range into
— UV-A: 315 nm to 380 nm;
— UV-B: 280 nm to 315 nm;
— UV-C: 100 nm to 280 nm.

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-1367, modified — the word “optical” has been added to the definition and

the CIE Notes 1, 2 and 3 have been deleted and replaced by Notes 1 and 2 to entry.]

3.2.4
infrared radiation
IR radiation

optical radiation (3.2.1) for which the wavelengths are longer than those for visible radiation (3.2.2),

from 780 nm to 1 mm

Note 1 to entry: For infrared radiation, the range between 780 nm and 1 mm is typically subdivided into:

— IR-A 780 nm to 1 400 nm, or 0,78 µm to 1,4 µm;
— IR-B 1,4 µm to 3,0 µm;
— IR-C 3 µm to 1 mm.

Note 2 to entry: A precise border between “visible” and “infrared” cannot be defined because visual sensation at

wavelengths greater than 780 nm is noted for very bright sources at longer wavelengths.

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ISO 4007:2018(E)

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-580, modified — the word “commonly” has been replaced by “typically” in

the first CIE note to entry, and the third CIE note has been deleted.]
3.2.5
monochromatic radiation
monochromatic light
optical radiation (3.2.1) characterized by a single frequency

Note 1 to entry: In practice, radiation of a very small range of frequencies which can be described by stating a

single frequency.

Note 2 to entry: The wavelength in air or in vacuum is also used to characterize a monochromatic radiation. The

medium shall be stated.

Note 3 to entry: The wavelength in standard air is normally used in photometry and radiometry.

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-788, modified — the word “optical” has been added in front of “radiation”

in the definition.]
3.2.6
illuminant

optical radiation (3.2.1) with a relative spectral power distribution defined over the wavelength range

that influences object colour perception

Note 1 to entry: In everyday English, this term is not restricted to this sense but is also used for any kind of light

falling on a body or scene.

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-554, modified — the word “optical” has been added in front of “radiation”

in the definition.]
3.2.7
CIE standard illuminants

illuminants (3.2.6) A and D65, defined by the CIE in terms of relative spectral power distributions

Note 1 to entry: These illuminants (3.2.6) are intended to represent:
— A: Planckian radiation with a temperature of 2 856 K;

— D65: The relative spectral power distribution representing a phase of daylight with a correlated colour

temperature of approximately 6 500 K (called also “nominal correlated colour temperature of the daylight

illuminant”).

Note 2 to entry: Illuminants B, C and other D illuminants, previously denoted as standard illuminants, should

now be termed CIE illuminants.
[8] [22]
Note 3 to entry: See also ISO 11664-2:2007 and CIE 015 .

Note 4 to entry: Tables defining the CIE standard illuminants A and D65 at 5 nm intervals can be viewed in the

downloads section at http: //www .cie .co .at/.

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-168, modified — the references to other standards in CIE Note 1 to entry

have been moved into a new Note 3 to entry, and a new Note 4 to entry has also been added.]

3.3 Sources of non-ionizing radiation
3.3.1
electric arc

self-maintained gas conduction for which most of the charge carriers are electrons supplied by primary-

electron emission

Note 1 to entry: During live working, the electric arc is generated by gas ionization arising from an unintentional

electrical conducting connection or breakdown between live parts or a live part and the earth path of an electrical

installation or an electrical device. During testing, the electric arc is initiated by the blowing of a fuse wire.

4 © ISO 2018 – All rights reserved
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ISO 4007:2018(E)
[SOURCE: IEC 61482-1-1:2009, 3.1.17]
3.3.2
air-arc cutting
arc gouging

thermal gouging or cutting method for metallic materials that uses an electric arc (3.3.1)

Note 1 to entry: This method uses a carbon electrode that forms a groove by melting or burning, while an air jet

attached to the electrode removes the molten material. This groove can be deepened using the same thermal

method to form a cut.
3.3.3
arc welding

electric welding method that uses an arc that is generated between the rod-shaped metal electrode and

the workpiece

Note 1 to entry: The electrode melting in the hot arc is used as the filler metal for the welded joint.

3.3.4
short-circuit electric arc

intensive arc that can occur through switching or a short-circuit in electricity distribution installations

3.3.5
gas cutting
flame cutting
thermal method of cutting metallic material using gas and oxygen
Note 1 to entry: This method does not use an electric arc (3.3.1).
3.3.6
plasma arc cutting

thermal cutting method for metallic materials that uses a constricted electric arc (3.3.1) and a high-

velocity jet of gas issuing from a constricting orifice to give a high-temperature plasma flame that melts

and removes the metallic material
3.3.7
blacklight lamp
ultraviolet radiation source

UV-A radiation source, generally a mercury vapour discharge lamp, with the bulb (high-pressure

radiation source) or tube (low-pressure radiation source) made from light-absorbing, but UV-A

transmitting, filter glass (3.6.1)
Note 1 to entry: The filter glass appears almost black in colour.
3.3.8
metal halide lamp

high intensity discharge lamp in which the major portion of the light (3.2.2) is produced from a mixture

of a metallic vapour and the products of the dissociation of metal halides
Note 1 to entry: Metal halide lamps can be clear or phosphor-coated.

[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-765, modified — "the term covers" has been replaced by "metal halide

lamps can be".]
3.3.9
low pressure mercury (vapour) lamp

discharge lamp of the mercury vapour type, with or without a coating of phosphors, in which during

operation, the partial pressure of the vapour does not exceed 100 Pa

Note 1 to entry: In mercury discharge lamps with a fluorescent layer, the layer is excited by the ultraviolet

radiation (3.2.3) of the discharge to generate visible radiation (3.2.2).
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ISO 4007:2018(E)
[SOURCE: CIE S 017:2011, 17-701, modified — Note 1 to entry has been added.]
3.3.10
medium pressure mercury (vapour) lamp

non-coherent radiation source containing mercury vapour at pressures ranging from 50 kPa to several

hundred kPa

Note 1 to entry: This type of lamp emits mostly from 200 nm to 1 000 nm with the most intense lines

approximately at 218 nm, 248 nm, 254 nm, 266 nm, 280 nm, 289 nm, 297 nm, 303 nm, 313 nm, 334 nm, 366 nm,

406 nm, 408 nm, 436 nm, 546 nm and 578 nm.

[SOURCE: IUPAC, modified — the term name has been altered by the deletion of the hyphen in "medium-

pressure" and the the addition of (vapour) to align with the CIE definitions of low pressure mercury

(vapour) lamp and high pressure mercury (vapour) lamp.]
3.3.11
high pressure mercury (vapour) lamp

high intensity discharge lamp in which the major portion of the light (3.2.2) is produced, directly or

indirectly, by radiation from mercury operating at a partial pressure in excess of 100 kPa

Note 1 to entry: High-pressure mercury (vapour) lamps can be clear, phosphor coated (mercury fluorescent) and

blended lamps. In fluore
...

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